Catastrophic Events and Disasters Can Ruin Your Day


Catastrophe means widespread disaster

For our purposes, the term “catastrophic” means widespread disaster that impacts a community . . . or an entire city or region.  By and large, natural disasters are the major concern. We seem to have a number of them every year, so preparing for them isn’t just an exercise.

Severe flood

Severe flood endangers lives

We can count on annual threats from hurricanes, tornadoes and wildfires. Less frequent would be accidental events like major floods, train wrecks, plane crashes, chemical plant explosions, nuclear meltdowns or terrorist attacks.

For the most part, our local, state and federal authorities are equipped to respond to all but the worst of these events.

When help may not come immediately

The one looming exception that has a predictable place in most of our futures is a major earthquake.  In some places in the United States, major earthquakes may be unlikely. But in key locations throughout the U.S. and the world the dominant geology makes earthquakes probable if not predictable.

Major earthquakes are unique in their potential for widespread damage to local and regional infrastructures as well as individual homes.  This often means that days or even weeks can go by before outside help can arrive. For these – and other – reasons, our priority here in Southern California is on survival planning for the aftermath of a major earthquake.

If earthquake is first on your list of priorities, don’t waste any time. Head over to BUILDING YOUR SURVIVAL SKILLS (to the right on this page) and click on “Preparing for Earthquakes.” You’ll get all our posts on that topic — and there are dozens of them.

I hope you get the info you need BEFORE the quake hits!

Virginia 
Your Emergency Plan Guide team

P.S. Don’t miss any of our special Advisories focused on a particular natural disaster. Here are three of them:

Flooding — The most common natural disaster

Tsunami — Earthquake along the ocean? Time to get moving!

Wildfires — You can’t shelter in place if a fire is bearing down on you.

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